Color & Fabric

Color & Fabric

Shari’s are classified with various different types and are known for the different fabrics used to manufacture them. We all realize that garments can make us agreeable in light of a specific season. Without, much of a stretch we created Shari’s keeping view every season and eve. A decent sample is having a cotton fabric for the late spring days. They are extremely spongy and cool to the skin. In any case, for cooler climate, there are thicker sorts of fabrics to utilize. They are light to the touch yet can in any case give warmth. More is about silk which can be draped at any time. And about colours they are the splashy and catchy when blended with seductive perfection. Colours in the shari appear wondrous as we compelled them finely.

Satin

Satin is a weave that typically has a glossy surface and a dull back. The satin weave is characterized by four or more fill or weft yarns floating over a warp yarn or vice versa, four warp yarns floating over a single weft yarn. Floats are missed interfacings, where the warp yarn lies on top of the weft in a warp-faced satin and where the weft yarn lies on top of the warp yarns in weft-faced satins.

A satin fabric tends to have a high luster due to the high number of floats on the fabric. Because of this it is used in making bed sheets. Many variations can be made of the basic satin weave including a granite weave and a check weave. Satin weaves, twill weaves, and plain weaves are the three basic types of weaving by which the majority of woven products are formed.

Blushing Pink
Candy Pink
Pearl Pink
Watermelon
Ruby
Burgundy
Orange
Daffodil
White
Ivory
Champagne
Gold
Brown
Chocolate
Black
Silver
Dark Green
Jade
Clover
Lime Green
Sage
Sky Blue
Pool
Ocean Blue
Royal Blue
Ink Blue
Dark Navy
Regency
Grape
Fuchsia
Lilac
Lavender

Chiffon

Chiffon is a lightweight, balanced plain-woven sheer fabric woven of alternate S- and Z-twist crepe (high-twist) yarns. The twist in the crepe yarns puckers the fabric slightly in both directions after weaving, giving it some stretch and a slightly rough feel.

Chiffon is an elegant and sheer fabric made of silk, rayon, cotton, or synthetics. It is very fine, thin hand and lightweight, soft and supple, which gives a beautiful drape. It wears very well but is difficult to handle when sewing. It has slightly bumpy look and is best suited to shirring, draping, gathering and tucking.

Chiffon is a plain weave fabric. It is made of loose and tightly twisted yarns. The yarns are either in the filling or the warp or both. It has crepe like texture because the threads are first twisted and then woven. It is very slight rough feel but is softer and thinner than Georgette. Polyester chiffon is very strong and dries quickly.

Chiffon is made from cotton, silk, or synthetic fibers. Under a magnifying glass it resembles a fine net or mesh which gives chiffon some see-through properties. Chiffon made from natural fibers can be dyed to almost any shade, but chiffon made from polyester requires specialized disperse dyes. Silk Chiffon is an elegant, sheer fabric with a soft, beautiful drape and crepe-like texture. Stronger and heavier than silk Gauze, woven in a way that even the heaviest weights are sheer.

Chiffon is most commonly used in evening wear, especially as an overlay, for giving an elegant and floating appearance to the gown. It is also a popular fabric used in blouses, ribbons, scarves and lingerie. Like other crêpe fabrics, chiffon can be difficult to work with because of its light and slippery texture. Due to this delicate nature, chiffon must be hand washed very gently.

Blushing Pink
Candy Pink
Pearl Pink
Watermelon
Ruby
Burgundy
Orange
Daffodil
White
Ivory
Champagne
Gold
Brown
Chocolate
Black
Silver
Dark Green
Jade
Clover
Lime Green
Sage
Sky Blue
Pool
Ocean Blue
Royal Blue
Ink Blue
Dark Navy
Regency
Grape
Fuchsia
Lilac
Lavender

Taffeta

Taffeta is a crisp, smooth, plain woven fabric made from silk or cuprammonium rayons. The word is Persian in origin and means "twisted woven." It is considered to be a "high-end" fabric, suitable for use in ball gowns, wedding dresses, and interiors for curtains or wallcovering. It is also widely used in the manufacture of corsets and corsetry: it yields a more starched-like type of cloth that holds its shape better than many other fabrics. An extremely thin, crisp type of taffeta is called paper taffeta.

There are two distinct types of silk taffeta: yarn-dyed and piece-dyed. Piece-dyed taffeta is often used in linings and is quite soft. Yarn-dyed taffeta is much stiffer and is often used in evening dresses. Shot silk taffeta was one of the most sought-after forms of Byzantine silk, and may have been the fabric known as purpura.

Silk Taffeta, whose name originated from the Persian word for twisted woven, is a fabric that continues to reign supreme in the world of silk. Soft with a muted luster and slight ribbing, taffeta is a flat fabric with an unmistakable rustle. Found in a wide array of finery including heirloom pieces, wedding gowns and many accessories, taffeta should be dry-cleaned.

From the 1970s until the 1990s, the Jiangsu province of China produced fine silk taffetas: these were less flexible than those from Indian mills, however, which continue to dominate production. Other countries in Southeast Asia and the Middle East also produce silk taffeta, but these products are not yet equal in quality or competitiveness to those from India. The most deluxe taffetas, however, are still woven in France, Italy, Russia, and the United Kingdom.

Blushing Pink
Candy Pink
Pearl Pink
Watermelon
Ruby
Burgundy
Orange
Daffodil
White
Ivory
Champagne
Gold
Brown
Chocolate
Black
Silver
Dark Green
Jade
Clover
Lime Green
Sage
Sky Blue
Pool
Ocean Blue
Royal Blue
Ink Blue
Dark Navy
Regency
Grape
Fuchsia
Lilac
Lavender

Organza

Organza is a thin, plain weave, sheer fabric traditionally made from silk. Many modern organza’s are woven with synthetic filament fibers such as polyester or nylon. Silk organza is woven by a number of mills along the Yangtze River and in the province of Zhejiang in China. A coarser silk organza is woven in the Bangalore area of India. Deluxe silk organza’s are woven in France and Italy.

Organza is used for bridal wear and evening wear. In the interiors market it is used for effects in bedrooms and between rooms. Double-width organzas in viscose and acetate are used as sheer curtains.

Organza has a much rougher texture than chiffon, but can create volume and body, where chiffon would fall flat. Chiffon will give a drapery effect, while organza will hold shape and remain stiff. Organza is commonly used in bridesmaid’s dresses, usually layered over a base satin shell or lining. Organza has also recently become popular for cocktail dresses. Because of its natural luster and shine, it lends itself towards evening wear. Organza cocktail dresses can be found in the collections of popular designers such as Oscar de la Renta, Monique Lhullier, Marchesa, and Allen Schwartz.

Organza has a much rougher texture than chiffon, but can create volume and body, where chiffon would fall flat. Chiffon will give a drapery effect, while organza will hold shape and remain stiff. Organza is commonly used in bridesmaid’s dresses, usually layered over a base satin shell or lining. Organza has also recently become popular for cocktail dresses. Because of its natural luster and shine, it lends itself towards evening wear. Organza cocktail dresses can be found in the collections of popular designers such as Oscar de la Renta, Monique Lhullier, Marchesa, and Allen Schwartz.

Organza is commonly used for self-embellishment techniques such as fabric feathers, ruffles, and ruching. One technique we have demonstrated is creating “feathers” from organza. Using a rotary cutter, zig zag down the middle of a rectangle of organza. This will create triangular feather shapes on one side of the organza, while leaving the other side a raw straight edge. Silk organza is a sheer fabric that also offers body and volume. The fabric can be used in a single layer, allowing the skin to be seen underneath, or in multiple layers to create shades and layers of transparency. Two great fabrics to use when looking to create transparency are organza and chiffon.

Blushing Pink
Candy Pink
Pearl Pink
Watermelon
Ruby
Burgundy
Orange
Daffodil
White
Ivory
Champagne
Gold
Brown
Chocolate
Black
Silver
Dark Green
Jade
Clover
Lime Green
Sage
Sky Blue
Pool
Ocean Blue
Royal Blue
Ink Blue
Dark Navy
Regency
Grape
Fuchsia
Lilac
Lavender

Stretch Satin

Stretch Satin is a high luster, polyester satin with stretch for form fitting special occasion dresses and outfits, including bridal gowns, bridesmaids and prom dresses. Debutant Stretch Satin is also ideal for dance wear and ice skating outfits for it's sheen, stretch and washability.

Satin is essentially the name of a weave and is not the name given to a specific raw material. It is created out of low-twist yarn by using the process of twill weaving. The weft threads, which are four horizontal yarns, are covered by a single lengthwise yarn, leading to fewer interlacings, which give satin its characteristic smoothness. Satin can be created out of polyester, wool, cotton and silk. However the latter is the best choice, and polyester a close second. Nevertheless, one should not confuse sateen’ with satin as sateen is a fabric created when a satin weave is applied to cotton.

It is not difficult to find out whether the fabric is silk or Satin. Satin has a very distinctive sheen which is glossy and smooth. One side of the fabric is very smooth and shiny while the other is matte or dull. Undoubtedly, Satin has a very luxurious feel and appearance, but it can be woefully challenging for tailors to deal with the fabric as it keeps slipping away!

Stretch satin has many different uses, and is highly desirable for the construction of sleepwear, lingerie, and bedding because of the amazing sensations it gives us when next to the skin. Silk satin is also used in the construction of a wide range of garments including evening gowns, and wedding gowns because of its beautiful, glossy appearance.

Stretch satin has gained a lot of prominence over the centuries and has been used in products ranging from garments to footwear. One cannot replace the luxurious feel of the Satin fabric, no matter which weave it is in. However, the one thing that has considerably changed about Satin over the years is the fact that it has become more affordable due to the innovative manufacturing of the fabric as well as the introduction of Satin created with synthetic threads.

Blushing Pink
Candy Pink
Pearl Pink
Watermelon
Ruby
Burgundy
Orange
Daffodil
White
Ivory
Champagne
Gold
Brown
Chocolate
Black
Silver
Dark Green
Jade
Clover
Lime Green
Sage
Sky Blue
Pool
Ocean Blue
Royal Blue
Ink Blue
Dark Navy
Regency
Grape
Fuchsia
Lilac
Lavender

Charmeuse

Charmeuse is a lightweight fabric woven with a satin weave, in which the warp threads cross over three or more of the backing (weft) threads. These float threads give the front of the fabric a smooth finish—lustrous and reflective—whereas the back has a dull finish. It can be made of silk or a synthetic lookalike such as polyester. Silk charmeuse is more expensive and delicate but is softer and a better insulator.Polyester charmeuse is cheaper and can often withstand machine washing, but it does not breathe as well as silk. Charmeuse differs from plain satin in that charmeuse has a different ratio of float (face) threads.

a soft, lightweight, drapable fabric of silk or synthetic fibers, having a semilustrous satin face and a dull back.

The luster and delicate hand make charmeuse suited to lingerie, flowing evening gowns, and drapey blouses. Bridal gowns sometime use charmeuse; however, the fabric does not hold a shape well, so it is not used for full, flared skirts; the charmeuse tends to cling and hang against the body. It is best suited to a more fluid, slinky bias cut, and drapes well.

When woven from polyester it can be a challenging fabric to sew; it tends to be slippery and may be difficult to control through the presser foot of a sewing machine. Seams have a tendency to pucker and pull; a smaller stitch length and properly balanced tensions can minimize this, though the experience of the sewer will affect the finished result as well. Pins can make holes and marks in polyester charmeuse so it's very important to use proper sharp dressmakers pins with a smooth, not abrupt, taper to the point. For greater ease of sewing, a sizing product can be sprayed on before cutting and washed out after the garment is completed.

The look of satin is prized for dressy garments, especially when cut on the bias, since it flows well on the body and catches light in stunning patterns.

Blushing Pink
Candy Pink
Pearl Pink
Watermelon
Ruby
Burgundy
Orange
Daffodil
White
Ivory
Champagne
Gold
Brown
Chocolate
Black
Silver
Dark Green
Jade
Clover
Lime Green
Sage
Sky Blue
Pool
Ocean Blue
Royal Blue
Ink Blue
Dark Navy
Regency
Grape
Fuchsia
Lilac
Lavender

Velvet Chiffon

Chiffon velvet is a type of velvet that is very lightweight, allowing it to drape in a variety of ways. Many fabric stores carry this velvet in an assortment of colors for people who want to custom-make garments, and various examples can also be seen in antique stores and in department stores in modern garments.

This style of velvet is sometimes called “transparent velvet,” in a reference to its sheer nature. The backing is typically silk or rayon, with a rayon pile. Like other velvets, chiffon velvet is woven in such a way that it has a very deep, complex texture, and it is also very stretchy and forgiving. The pile can be left plain or embossed with various designs, depending on the manufacturer's inclination and the demand for a particular style.

When well cared for, chiffon velvet can last a long time, especially if it starts out as a high-quality textile. Because it has a tendency to unravel, it is very important for people who sew with it to bind the seams to keep them secure, as otherwise the garment may start to fray and ultimately come apart. The fabric should be washed at cool temperatures and hung to dry, and it should not be ironed, as this can press the pile of the fabric out of shape.

Seamstresses often love to work with this material because it drapes so elegantly on a wide variety of figures. The light weight keeps the fabric from being oppressive, even when a lot is used, and this can be very useful in warm weather or warmer climates, where traditional velvets might feel too heavy to be worn. It is common to see it draped in folds, and it may be embroidered, beaded, or otherwise decorated.

As a general rule, chiffon velvet is used primarily in women's clothing, because the fabric does not lend itself well to men's designs. In addition to being used in things like dresses and skirts, it also shows up in scarves, hats, sashes, purses, and other accessories.

Blushing Pink
Candy Pink
Pearl Pink
Watermelon
Ruby
Burgundy
Orange
Daffodil
White
Ivory
Champagne
Gold
Brown
Chocolate
Black
Silver
Dark Green
Jade
Clover
Lime Green
Sage
Sky Blue
Pool
Ocean Blue
Royal Blue
Ink Blue
Dark Navy
Regency
Grape
Fuchsia
Lilac
Lavender

Satin Chiffon

French for the word cloth, Chiffon remains a dignified, sheer fabric with an ease in drape and crepe-like texture. Even with a dry hand, Chiffon manages to have a small amount of give, amicable to designers who specialize in eveningwear. The inherent brilliance of this fabric is due to the triangular shape of each fiber that refracts light in many directions. Lightweight and absorbent, Chiffon will keep you comfortable in the summer as well as warm in the winter since it holds warm air close to your skin. Mood's silk Chiffon collection is loved by fashion designers and professional dress makers for its wide range in pattern, color and sheer quality.

Blushing Pink
Candy Pink
Pearl Pink
Watermelon
Ruby
Burgundy
Orange
Daffodil
White
Ivory
Champagne
Gold
Brown
Chocolate
Black
Silver
Dark Green
Jade
Clover
Lime Green
Sage
Sky Blue
Pool
Ocean Blue
Royal Blue
Ink Blue
Dark Navy
Regency
Grape
Fuchsia
Lilac
Lavender

30DChiffon

The D stands for denier, a unit of measure for linear mass density of fibers. In a nutshell, if the chiffon has low denier number, it’s lighter, more sheer, fine and soft. If the chiffon have high denier count, it’s heavy, less sheer and coarser.

30D is a low denier count. Therefore 30D chiffon dresses are very comfy to wear, light and breathable.

Blushing Pink
Candy Pink
Pearl Pink
Watermelon
Ruby
Burgundy
Orange
Daffodil
White
Ivory
Champagne
Gold
Chocolate
Black
Jade
Lime Green
Sage
Sky Blue
Pool
Royal Blue
Ink Blue
Dark Navy
Grape
Fuchsia

Jersey

Jersey is a knit fabric used predominantly for clothing manufacture. It was originally made of wool, but is now made of wool, cotton, and synthetic fibres. Since medieval times Jersey, Channel Islands, where the material was first produced, had been an important exporter of knitted goods and the fabric in wool from Jersey became well known. The fabric can be a very stretchy single knitting, usually light-weight, jersey with one flat side and one piled side. When made with a lightweight yarn, this is the fabric most often used to make T-shirts. Or it can be a double knitted jersey (interlock jersey), with less stretch, that creates a heavier fabric of two single jerseys knitted together to leave the two flat sides on the outsides of the fabric, with the piles in the middle. Jersey is considered to be an excellent fabric for draped garments, such as dresses, and women's tops.

Jersey fabric is a type of knit textile made from cotton or a cotton and synthetic blend. Some common uses for jersey fabric include t-shirts and winter bedding. The fabric is warm, flexible, stretchy, and very insulating, making it a popular choice for the layer worn closest to the body. Jersey also tends to be soft, making it very comfortable. The textile is named for the island of Jersey. Jersey is the largest of a group of islands known as the Channel Islands, located between England and France. The island has a long history of human occupation, and is also well known for Jersey cows, typically raised for their rich, creamy milk.

A knitting machine is used to make jersey, since it can create the small, even, close grained stitches associated with jersey fabric. Like many other knit fabrics, jersey fabric has a right side and a wrong side. The right side of the material is marked by a series of very small lines which run vertically, and the wrong side has a horizontal grain. In most cases, a garment made from jersey fabric is sewn with the right side facing out, unless the seamstress is making a deliberate stylistic choice.

One of the reasons many people like to wear jersey fabric is the stretch factor. The fabric can stretch up to 25% percent along its grain. Garments made from the material have plenty of give as their wearers move, and also tend to cling to the body, since the fabric contracts as well as expanding. Knit dresses are usually made from jersey fabric, exploiting the clingy characteristic of the fabric. Jersey fabric is also available in a large assortment of colors and patterns to suit all tastes.

Candy Pink
Pearl Pink
Ruby
Burgundy
Orange
White
Ivory
Champagne
Gold
Brown
Chocolate
Black
Silver
Clover
Lime Green
Sage
Pool
Ocean Blue
Royal Blue
Dark Navy
Regency
Grape
Fuchsia
Lilac
Lavender

Matte Jersey

Known for their characteristically dry hand, matte jerseys feature all the pre-existing characteristics of a jersey with the addition of this hand. Featuring a fantastic amount of stretch, you can easily create bodycon dresses, skirts and tops that are sure to stop the clock. Easily draped this material’s dry hand allows tight fitted garments to remain comfortable as matte jersey will not stick to the skin.

Lightweight rayon blended fabric with a soft feel and subtle creepy texture. It's great for travel since it does not wrinkle, packs well and offers comfort and ease. Matte jersey is used in a variety of sportswear separates, tops and dresses. An essential wardrobe builder.

Candy Pink
Ruby
Burgundy
Orange
Daffodil
White
Ivory
Champagne
Gold
Brown
Chocolate
Black
Silver
Dark Green
Jade
Clover
Lime Green
Sky Blue
Pool
Ocean Blue
Royal Blue
Dark Navy
Regency
Grape
Fuchsia
Lilac
Lavender